The Judaica House, Ltd. with sloping roof graphic

View your shopping cart.

Categories

Talmud Guidebooks

Banner Message

NEW! My Pesach Kitchen LIST...$32.99 ON SALE...$26.99!

A Concise Guide to the Sages

A Concise Guide to the Sages

$35.96
$39.95
You Save:
$3.99
Sale 10% off 1 item
More Info

Rabbinic literature is called the Oral Law, because it is not found in the text of the Bible. It was preserved as oral statements that originated with the giving of the Torah and became the focus of study and deliberation throughout the generations. The Oral Law comprises explanations of biblical verses, ancient halakhic traditions not rooted in the text of the Bible, and rabbinic ordinances enacted throughout the generations. Since the scope of rabbinic literature is enormous, this work is limited to citing the Mishna, the Babylonian Talmud and the Jerusalem Talmud, the minor tractates, and the aggadic Midrash primarily Midrash Rabba and Midrash Tanhuma. The basis of this anthology is largely the aggadic material in the Talmud and in the various works of aggadic Midrash. The matters included here serve as commentary on the written Torah. Features: -Introductions and explanations that place talmudic and midrashic passages in context -Talmudic discussions broken down to component parts to aid comprehension -Full integration with other Concise Guide volumes The Erez Series is comprised of the Concise Guides to the full gamut of Jewish thought, from the Torah to modern halakha (Jewish law) and Mahshava (Jewish philosophy). The late Rabbi Adin Even Israel Steinsaltz zt'l was one of the leading thinkers of the modern age and the most prolific author of Jewish thought and commentary since the middle ages. The Erez Series distills the essence of 4 of the principal schools of the Jewish tradition Torah, the Sages (Hazal), Halakha, and Mahshava as a tool for review or introduction to the world of Jewish thought.

Aiding Talmud Study

Aiding Talmud Study

$17.99
More Info

Contains key Aramaic words, phrases, and abbreviations, with English translation. With Rabbi Shmuel ha-Naggid's 'Introduction to the Talmud,' in English.

SEFER MILIM - JASTROW

Dictionary of the Targumim, Talmud Bavli, Talmud Yerushalmi and Midrashic Literature

$44.95
More Info
New, larger edition! Commonly known as the Jastrow Dictionary, this work is the definitive choice for studying the Talmud, Midrashim and Targumim. With over 30,000 entries, it is far more comprehensive than any other dictionary of Aramaic/Hebrew available. Each entry is fully vocalized, defined in English and presented in various contexts, and word roots are cross-referenced wherever possible. An invaluable resource!
GEMARA CARD

GEMARA CARD

$4.95
More Info
The Gemara Card is one six-sided leaflet that includes all you need to learn and understand the gemara. Features include: A glossary of the main Aramaic words, basic grammar rules and examples, abbreviations, historical & geographical placement of sages, numerical values and measures. A perfect first aid for gemara learners!
MADRICH LEMOREH: SUKKAH

MADRICH LEMOREH: SUKKAH

$14.95
$14.95
$14.95
More Info
This work is published by OUPress.

Talmud learning lies at the heart of the Jewish soul and is a focus of Jewish education. Its study can be extremely impactful but multiple challenges confront the teacher of Talmud:

- Which sugyot and mekorot should I choose? - Which approaches will resonate most with my students? - How do I find the sources that most effectively resolve the most difficult challenges in the sugya? - And, of course, how do I find the time to prepare as well as I should?

This experience-based work provides educators with a curricular resource that addresses these challenges in a user-friendly, clear and concise format.

From the introduction to the book:

This guide is meant to be a resource to assist Talmud teachers in their preparation for high school level classes. The sources that are cited are intended to provide important background knowledge for classes on any level, while more advanced classes may cover more of the sources inside the texts. In each sugya I highlighted the most central sources that can be added to the teaching of the Talmud. My choices are based on their value in terms of: 1) addressing the most basic and compelling questions that emerge from the Talmud, 2) providing important general knowledge of Talmud and halacha, 3) developing the basic skills of learning Talmud with mefarshim, and 4) addressing the philosophical questions that high school students are likely to be intrigued by in each particular sugya.

In the footnotes I attempted to explain the relative pedagogical value of each sugya and each additional source, as I explained why one may or may not chose to teach that material in a high school class. This work is different than other "likutim" in that all sources are chosen specifically based on educational concerns, with high school students in particular in mind. The premise of this work is that the choices of what to teach and what to skip is a critical educational decision that teachers must make. The limitation of time alone dictates the reality that more is skipped than is studied. For many students, the particular Torah lessons that are studied in classes become the basis for their understanding of Judaism in general. It is with this possibility in mind that my choices are made.

It is also important to highlight the fact that the impact of Talmud class within the Judaic Studies curriculum is often central and expansive. It comprises a large segment of time within the schedule and profoundly impacts the students' understanding of Judaism. The study of Torah offers a glimpse into the values, beliefs and inspiration that Judaism represents. Teachers must be cognizant of this in the preparation of the units. Similarly, the philosophical assumptions that are implicitly or explicitly conveyed through a sugya will shape the students' understanding of Judaism, while the teacher may not realize this. In this sense, teachers must consider the messages that are being expressed and be sure to provide students with a full picture of the Torah values. This often requires the addition of external sources, as one sugya may offer only a small slice of the picture. This too makes it critical that the teacher think carefully about what we are choosing to teach and what we are not teaching. It was with this perspective in mind that I have prepared this work and offered my suggestions of how to present each unit. I attempted to articulate my rationales in the footnotes. It is my hope that other teachers will find it helpful in their own thinking and planning.

Meseches Kinim Explained

Meseches Kinim Explained - Hardcover

$11.95
More Info

Maseches Kinim deals with cases in which something went wrong in the process of bringing korbanos of birds. To the uninitiated, the cases and their consequences sometimes seem complicated and difficult to follow. However, Kinim is easier to learn than it seems – and this innovative book will prove it.This sefer guides one through each case, with an expanded translation of the Mishnayos, an analysis of the facts of the case, the din, and the reason for the din. Also contains more than 80 diagrams and review questions and answers, features designed to be used separately or in combination, by those as young as pre-bar mitzvah as well as adults. Not simply for learners of Daf Yomi, this is a valuable resource for anyone looking for clarity in this Masechta.

Grammar for Talmud and Targum Onkelos

$29.95
More Info